About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 2
KGO (ABC) 2
WETA 2
WMAR (ABC) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
WJLA 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 31
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
're seeing in boston tonight. obviously, in chicago, they are waiting with great anticipation to see the president. and in boston, there is also anticipation but it's more like resigned anticipation. people who thought they were coming to a party instead are kind of watching a durnlg on-- durge. >> look at the demographic ps of these two crowds. that's all you need to know. >> ifill: that's a good point, david. when you look at the obama crowd, it's incredibly diverse, very young, obviously, in a better mood. ( laughter ). but the difference between that and what we're seeing in boston is pretty striking. >> you know, the country is changing. i mean, the gay marriage thing is part of the change, but the demographicez of the country are changing. the thing that's more confusing is the economics are changing and in much more complicated ways. that we're not seeing it's working class people, the people who are unemployed aren't in either crowds. they can't afford to be in those crowds. that's complicated. but the demographics and attitudes towards gay marriage and other social issues, t
that gave him more latitude with the conservative base of the party. >> woodruff: speak of boston, and other places, let's hear now from our colleagues-- actually, ray suarez is in chicago. he and margaret warner are at the two presidential campaign headquarters, but, ray, we're going to come to you first. are you in chicago, and that's where president obama is tonight. >> that's right. he's just a few miles away. he's not here yet. and neither are a lot of the senior officials from the campaign. i think they probably want to waito see a little bit more, but illinois senior senator, senator dick durbin is here, and there have been a lot of poll closings, a lot of projections, but so far no surprises. what do you need to see before you can really relax? >> some of the key battled ground states-- florida, virginia, ohio, and of course when we get in the midwest, a little closer to my activity in the last few months for the president, taking a look at wis cons and i know iowa. if we can get the job done in the midwest, and i hope we do glie you're not up thisickle. whn you don't have a race, wh
our colleague ray swawrers and hopefully we'll be joined by margaret warner in boston. ray is at the presidential candidate night headquarters in chicago. ray, what is the sense right now? when we talk about this ground game issue, what does the campaign say about what they have over the romney campaign in terms of ground game? >> they said this time instead of sending volunteers and sending field workers from state to state, they concentrated much more heavily on using people that people know. i mean it sounds kind of obvious. but all the research shows that when someone you know talks about you... talks to you about casting the vote in the first place or voting for the person you prefer, that has a lot more impact than somebody showing up at your door with paperwork, a leaflet or a pitch for a candidate. so they've put much more emphasis on having people work their own neighborhoods this time around. and they say they have hit their marks, that they are getting out their numbers. and so far so good. gwen? >> ifill: well, ray, i'm also curious. you're standing there at the
, nancy. jan crawford has been covering the romney campaign. she is in boston tonight. jan? >> well, scott, governor romney just landed here about an hour ago after making campaign stops in that key state of ohio and in pennsylvania. he talked to reporters on the way back on the plane and he said he felt good about this campaign. they hadn't left anything in the locker room and that he thinks they're going to win. he said he just finished his victory speech. he's not written a concession speech. now, the mood inside the campaign tonight, scott, is one of cautious optimism, i'd say. but there is a little bit of nervousness and here's why: campaign sources that i'm talking with tonight say they are encouraged by the high numbers of republican turnout they're seeing in these swing states like ohio, florida, virginia. they believe that will outperform john mccain in 2008. that's the key to this election. they really had to run up the score in those areas. but here's where the nervousness comes in. they're also seeing some of the president's turnout in some of those democratic areas like in nor
colleague ray swawrers and hopefully we'll be joined by oargaret warner in boston. ray is at the presidential candidate nigh headquarters in hicago. ray, what is the sense right now? when we talk about this ground game issue, what does the campaign say about what they have over the romney campaign ic terms of ground game? >> they said this time instead of sending volunteers and sending field workers from state to state, they concentrated much more heavily on using people that people know. i mean it sounds kind of obvious. but all the research shows that when someone you know talks about you... talks to youatbout casting the vote in the first place or voting for the person you prefer, that has a lot more impact than somebody showing up at your door with paperwork, a leaflet or a pitch for a candidate. so they've put much more emphasis on havingb people work their own neighborhoods this time around. and they say they have hit their marks, that they are getting out their numbers. and so far so good. gwen? >> ifill: well, ray, i'm also curious. you're standing there at the
chicago and president obama. mitt romney at his headquarters in boston. victory and concession speeches from across the country. but the night, your reaction by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter. live coverage begins at 8:00 eastern. you can access interactive maps and the election results, track state ballot initiatives at c- span.org. >> we are bringing you historical victory and concession speeches throughout the day here on c-span. coming up, we bring you president george conceding critic george bush conceding the race to arkansas gov. bill clinton. he speaks to supporters and family members at the westin galleria in houston. [applause] >> thank you very much. listen, we have got to get going. thank you. thank you very much. >> thank you, george. >> thank you so much. well, here's the way i see it. here's the way we see it and the country should see it -- that the people have spoken and we respect the majesty of the democratic system. i just called governor clinton over in little rock and offered my congratulations. he did run a strong campaign. i wish him well in the white house
eastern time to concede the race. jan crawford is in boston where the republican nominee spoke to his supporters. >> reporter: governor romney waited about an hour to concede after the state of ohio was called for the president. everyone thought it's over but the romney campaign wanted to see some more of the actual votes from some of those suburbs around cincinnati. they didn't want to give up. when colorado was declared for the president, the campaign knew that was it, romney picked up the phone and called the president. >> this election is over, but our principles endure. i believe that the principles upon which this nation was founded are the only sure guide to aesurgent economy and to renewed greatness. >> reporter: a defeated mitt romney was gracious. >> i believe in america. i believe in the people of america. >> reporter: after running for president for 17 months, his campaign came up empty. >> like so many of you, paul and i have left everything on the field. we have given our all to this campaign. >> reporter: there was clear disappointment as the reality of what could have
. and nbc has the president up by 6 points. got all that? joining us now from boston, david. he directs polling. >> he want to run it down from your point of view. you have canvassed the whole country, know what's going on. ohio, how do you see it? >> i see it really close. if you look at the last four polls, it's one point. 1 through 8 the poll was average four to five points. what we look at is the head-to-head number. the last three consecutive polls, excluding the two you mentioned were at 48. that's a sign of vulnerability. obviously you have seven candidates on the ballot. i think those polls that had the plus four, plus five overstated obama's support because they overcounting a strong democratic county, and they had a party differential in those polls of democrats with an 8 point advantage party affiliation. >> so you see romney momentum in ohio? >> i see romney strong enough to be within a point. and that's exactly where the last four polls showed him. >> so the governor has a very, very -- he has a very good chance in ohio. how about florida? >> i don't think so. as we talked
. first we start with john roberts who is live in boston where he's been traveling with the mitt romney campaign, and an empty room behind you today, john. >> reporter: it is an empty room. we feel like that final scene in ferris bueller's day off saying why are you still here, it's over go home. the romney campaign is scratching its head trying to figure out what happened yesterday. they clearly thought they had enough votes in florida, virginia, and ohio to carry things over-the-top. they were talking with their get out the vote people, who said they were getting them out to the polls and we think we can carry this off. and suddenly puff. it has to be a bitter disappointment after six long years, the hours put in and the money spent. he dead his best not to show that in his concession speech as he appealed to his supporters to embrace the very best of america. >> we look to our parents, in the final analysis everything depends on the success of our homes. we look to job creators of all kinds, we are counting on you to invest, to hire, to step forward. and we look to democrats and repu
the obama campaign and boston behind the scenes with romney. to the heated battleground states across the country where this election will be decided and our team tracking your vote everywhere in the crossroads of the world with the crowds in times square. and with our partners from univision in miami plus abc's barbara walters, katie couric and our powerhouse team telling you who's winning and why on this historic night, election night 2012, the stakes so high, the race so close, america's next president decided tonight. it's "your voice, your vote." once again from abc news election headquarters in times square, new york, diane sawyer and george stephanopoulos. >> you are looking at times square, usa, the pulse of the nation. also the crossroads of the world, 182 million people pass through here every year and tonight, it is election headquarters for abc news and we are so glad to have you back with us on this very big night, george. >> we have an entire team right out here with us. our reporters an analysts over on that side of the room, jon karl karl, cokie robert, ron brownstein.
traditionally vote for the democratic candidate. >> pelley: thank you, we're going to switch over to boston and speak to ed gillespie who is one of mitt romney's autopsy communicatio --top communicatio. thank you for being with us. it looks like ohio is leaning the president's way. i wonder how you see ohio. >> we feel pretty good about ohio, scott. the fact is where you look where the turnout is highest, we have great turnout in republican leading areas. we were able to shave 263,000 votes in the early vote in the absentee ballots from the advantage that president obama enjoyed over senator mccain in 2008. in the diminishment of the democrats early vote advantage, our republican intensity and what we've been seeing in the polls relative to independent voters in ohio, we feel like it's very much in our side tonight when i look at where these votes are coming in from we also female good about thal -- feel good about the numbers in the county and precincts and need to carry with big numbers and we're doing that tonight. >> pelley: one of the swing states we do not have enough information to
today. i can give you a sense of the room, a swelling crowd at the convention center here in boston. people are holding a small, you know, american flag, ready to greet him. ready to hear what mitt romney, ann romney, the family they have supported will come down and they'll have a united front as this family always does. i have to say there is some question in the room about whether or not the governor is headed down here. those numbers in ohio are so close and there is a thought among some people in here that perhaps they're not absolutely ready to concede. we'll continue to work that out. one of my partners in crime on the trail off-air reporter emily friedman did an amazing job working that part of the story but as you can see here, the crowd is fixed on the screens as they have been for the last half hour. it's very quiet in here. it's been quiet really for most of the night except for the initial wins and early states, a difficult evening for the people who really thought as this campaign portrayed in the last 24, 48 hours that they really had a shot at winning the presidency
of massachusetts and made more u-turns in a boston cabdriver in trying to to get to where he was. when you look at the results of this election you can draw a direct connection between the policies president obama has led on and the voting support he got. if on the face of this republicans decide what they really need to do is to go back and do it even more conservative again, far be it from me to persuade them otherwise. we have another election four years, but it would not be wise. >> on the religion question, i agree with blaise and ann but i would add one thing. if you look at the polling of people who said they would be less likely to vote for a candidate because they were a mormon, the majority of those people thought barack obama is a muslim who was born in kenya. so it's the demographic. it wasn't there to make it a negative but it is true that democrats make it an issue. >> some of the positions romney took during the primaries really hurt specifically with regard to immigration reform. i think newt gingrich said that romney was the most conservative on that issue and in a country wher
heard from mitt romney on his campaign charter heading into boston last night. he thought he was going to win too. he said he had no regrets and was proud of his campaign. but as for why this campaign went down in defeat, that adviser tells me that they are pointing to what the obama campaign was predicting, they were going to have a good turnout in the word of the adviser, the obama campaign was right. as for the future of the republican party, i talked to a top conservative leader inside the republican party who said the gop will have to do a better job talking about immigration reform with latinos if they have any hopes of winning a presidential election in the near future. john? >>> presidential race is settled, but we're still looking at key races to determine the final numbers for the balance of power in the united states senate and the house of representatives. our chief congressional correspondent dana bash is with us for breaking news in north dakota. >> cnn can project the democratic candidate for senate, heidi heitkamp, in north dakota, has won that seat. she's kept that sea
-choice governor of massachusetts. since then you make more u-turns in a boston cab driver to train ticket to the place where he was. when you look at the results of this election and as they say come you can try a direct connection to the policies, president obama has led them to voting support is in the face of this. the republicans decide that they need to do and do it even more conservative again to try to persuade them otherwise. it wouldn't be wise. >> on the religion question, i agree with blaise and ann, but if you look at the polling is that they be less to vote for a candidate because they were mormon, majority of those people thought barack obama is a muslim born in kenya. so the demographic was in the air to make a negative, but it is true that democrats did not make it an issue and that's a good thing. >> some of the positions romney took during the primaries specifically with regard to immigration reform. i think was newt gingrich has said romney was most conservative on that issue and in the country where that's the fastest growing bloc of voters. it's really not a good poli
on the appeals court in boston. he is from portland and have been backed by both republican senators. he was part of what they call -- sermons -- thurmond rule. >> thurmond leahy rule. >> and biscayne, from maine -- king, claiming the party alignment is up for grabs. his initial request is he would align with whatever party agreed to push for essentially doing away with the current filibuster rules. harry reid made clear he is not willing to go that far. i know still think angus king will align with a democrat. he endorsed obama. >> and he said yesterday he had conversations with him in the past 24 hours. >> and a phone call with bob corker. the point being that this is the kind of thing that i think a lot of freshmen -- king most vocal among them, they will come to the senate and say let us not spend our first months of this silliness of gratuitous filibuster and blocking a holding everything. let's clear out the underbrush. like you are speaking about, who none of us ever heard of. these are assistant secretary is -- assistant secretaries that one or two senators even carry about. then i think
," bruce springsteen] >> and now, mitt romney's concession speech, from boston. this is about five minutes. >> thank you. thank you. thank you. thank you, my friends. thank you so very much. [applause] thank you. thank you. thank you. i have just called president obama to congratulate him on his victory. his supporters and his campaign also deserve congratulations. his supporters and his campaign also deserve congratulations. i wish all of them well, but particularly the president, the first lady and their daughters. [applause] this is a time of great challenges for america, and i pray that the president will be successful in guiding our nation. [applause] i want to thank paul ryan for all that he has done for our campaign. [applause] and for our country. besides my wife, ann, paul is the best choice i've ever made. [applause] and i trust that his intellect and his hard work and his commitment to principle will continue to contribute to the good of our nation. [applause] i also want to thank ann, the love of my life. [applause] she would have been a wonderful first lady. she's -- she has b
real. host: next call is from boston, on the democratic line. caller: from the iranian perspective, i would like to remind you that it was the united states that fired the first shot when it launched a virus against a dangerous situation. perhaps you did not think they would respond. if you did not, you should not be in the job you are in. have a nice day. guest: i don't know what the question was. host: let's hear from an independent scholar in ohio. caller: morning, i am fascinated about how many people are against this cyber security act. why would the government have to tell you to lock your front door and closed her windows at night to keep people from breaking in? if you live in a neighborhood where there is a large number of these break-ins, it is common sense that the neighbors would get together and tell each other about the different methods that were being used, not what you have in your house. if you run a business and you don't lock your front gate or your doors are file cabinets, you are an idiot. why the government should even have to tell you that -- if you had the hop
can give you a sense of the crowd though. there say swelg crowd here in boston. people are holding small american flags, they're ready to greet him and hear what mitt romney will say. they'll have a united front as the romney family always does. there is some question about whether the governor is headed down here at this moment. the numbers in ohio are so close and there is a thought among some in here that perhaps they're not ready to concede. we'll continue to work that out. emily freedman is working that part of the story. as you can see here t crowd is really fixed on the screens as they have been for the last half an hour. it's very quiet in here and has been for most of the night except for some of the initial wins in the early states. a difficult evening for the people who thought as his campaign portrayed that they had a shot at winning the presidency tonight. . >> and i keep thinking a lot about the girls of the president. what is it to see your father, there they are, they're 11 and 14 now. >> i remember those words when they wint to the lincoln memorial and talked abo
] guest: right now with of the boston does is something like he said. -- but the filibuster does is something like you said. a call the pathway to -- host: the pathway to 60 includes an independent from the state of maine who has not said what party he will caucus with. guest: i think it is a good bet he will sit with the democrats. one of our reporters spoke to harry reid, and he called angus king, who i do not think will stay for awhile. the republicans went after anxious -- angus king and the democrats did not endorse. they attack the republicans, but they did not endorse. i think basically harry reid is confident he will be sitting on their side of the aisle. host: mike, new york, democratic caller. caller: i wanted to focus in on three things i believe the democrats as well as the republicans should do that would move lower country forward. let's start with the republicans -- our country forward. let's start with the republicans. i was there with the perspective of not being mean- spirited. we know it is not going to happen 100%. the republicans think they have good ideas in
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)